David Northrop aka Boney Beezly.

Chilled Out Entertainer

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watchgroupies:

Production Meeting. 02.15.13

Our lead actor Christian Tayer was able to join us at today’s production meeting. Christian got his start doing stand up at 13 years old when he was a regular guest on The Man Show. He was the first person I wanted to play “David” from the moment I wrote my first page of script. It was such a relief to get him on board and finally read through these scenes with him. Kyle made a little Vine vid and helped us get alot of production goals laid out. Next week we shoot our kickstarter video! -Boney

(Source: watchgroupies)

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watchgroupies:

This is Michael Dean Agius (Pronounced Age-Us) He’s going to be playing the role of Jayson. Mikey is a tremendous talent with great improv instincts. He currently resides in Arizona. We currently have about half of the principle characters cast and we’re ready to start doing some Skype table readings to work out the acting side of this script.  We’re all stoked like the fires of Mordor to have you aboard.  -Boney

The Face of Jayson revealed.

watchgroupies:

This is Michael Dean Agius (Pronounced Age-Us) He’s going to be playing the role of Jayson. Mikey is a tremendous talent with great improv instincts. He currently resides in Arizona. We currently have about half of the principle characters cast and we’re ready to start doing some Skype table readings to work out the acting side of this script.  We’re all stoked like the fires of Mordor to have you aboard.  -Boney

The Face of Jayson revealed.

1 note

Here's the tumblr for our web series "Groupies"

It’s called Groupies because it’s about kids in group homes…and because I love “Goonies” and also because people are likely to click on the word “Groupies” more frequently than the term “Group Homies”

Kyle and I made a tumblr and facebook and youtube channel for it today, and we did a table reading of the script.

Go follow the Production Diary tumblr!

Or you could not follow it…it’s your body girl…DO WHAT YOU WANT!

Groupies is all about a woman’s right to choose…to follow us @watchgroupies

Twitter.com/watchgroupies

Facebook.com/watchgroupies

youtube.com/watchgroupies

Filed under watchgroupies fresnofilmmaker webseries boney beezly

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Anonymous asked: Just wanted you to know I just read your first memory post and my heart is still aching. I don't know what else to say about it, but I feel differently now. I don't think I'll ever forget it.

thanks for reading it. I totally won’t ever forget it either.

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Anonymous asked: Are panda bears still your favorite animal...even when they bite?

no I was into Pandas for a while, but now I’m more of a baby sloth man.

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Hey,

I’m doing a comedy set at Mother Mary’s in Clovis on Saturday.

We’ll be shooting a lil’ footage to use for the kickstarter campaign.

If you want to come be a part of it you can get tickets at this link…the address is there to.

http://www.livemusiccity.com/event/2873/

Also

The kickstarter campaign is for a comedy film we plan to make.

You are all my favorite.

-boney

P.S.  Isn’t this a sick video of Chet Baker?

26,840 notes

tinuelena:

Whose intervention ensured Star Trek saw the light of day?
Answer: Lucille Ball
Most people recognize and remember Lucille Ball as the lovable and silly star of one of America’s earliest and most loved sitcoms, I Love Lucy. What most people don’t know is that Lucille was a savvy business woman and that she and her husband Desi Arnaz had amassed a small fortune and owned their own studio, Desilu.
It was at Desilu that acclaimed Sci-Fi screenwriter and visionary Gene Roddenberry got his big break. Roddenberry pitched the Star Trek pilot to the studio as a sort of Western-inspired space adventure. While many within the studio balked at the idea, Lucille liked the idea and the first pilot was approved and filmed. The pilot was pitched to NBC and was promptly rejected on the grounds that it was too intellectual, not enough like the space-western they had been lead to believe it would be, and audiences wouldn’t relate to it. Lucille, a fan of Roddenberry’s work, pushed back against NBC and insisted they order a second pilot. Ordering a second pilot was a practice almost entirely unheard of and save for Lucille’s charisma and clout with the network it would never have happened.
Roddenberry shot the second pilot, NBC accepted it, and Star Trek premiered in 1966, thus beginning a new era in the Sci-Fi genre and laying the foundation for half a century of Star Trek fandom–an era that would have never come to pass without the intervention and insistence of Lucille Ball.
Bonus Trivia: After her divorce from Arnaz, Lucille bought out his share of their studio. As a result she became the first woman to both head and own a major studio. (*)

tinuelena:

Whose intervention ensured Star Trek saw the light of day?

Answer: Lucille Ball

Most people recognize and remember Lucille Ball as the lovable and silly star of one of America’s earliest and most loved sitcoms, I Love Lucy. What most people don’t know is that Lucille was a savvy business woman and that she and her husband Desi Arnaz had amassed a small fortune and owned their own studio, Desilu.

It was at Desilu that acclaimed Sci-Fi screenwriter and visionary Gene Roddenberry got his big break. Roddenberry pitched the Star Trek pilot to the studio as a sort of Western-inspired space adventure. While many within the studio balked at the idea, Lucille liked the idea and the first pilot was approved and filmed. The pilot was pitched to NBC and was promptly rejected on the grounds that it was too intellectual, not enough like the space-western they had been lead to believe it would be, and audiences wouldn’t relate to it. Lucille, a fan of Roddenberry’s work, pushed back against NBC and insisted they order a second pilot. Ordering a second pilot was a practice almost entirely unheard of and save for Lucille’s charisma and clout with the network it would never have happened.

Roddenberry shot the second pilot, NBC accepted it, and Star Trek premiered in 1966, thus beginning a new era in the Sci-Fi genre and laying the foundation for half a century of Star Trek fandom–an era that would have never come to pass without the intervention and insistence of Lucille Ball.

Bonus Trivia: After her divorce from Arnaz, Lucille bought out his share of their studio. As a result she became the first woman to both head and own a major studio. (*)

(via jessicatmeowgan)